Conflicting Childhood Memory

I was about 6 years old when I had my tonsils removed. 

Mom picked me up from the hospital and the first place she took me was an ice cream shop.  She said I could have anything in the store and I could eat as much ice cream as I wanted. 

I had so many conflicting feelings at that moment and it was hard for my little brain to contemplate them all.

A part of me was elated.  This was like a dream come true.  However, a part of me was dejected.  My throat was so sore, I didn’t feel like eating anything. 

I finally decided to get an ice cream sandwich, which I ate with great difficulty and little sadness.

This is one of those childhood memories that will forever be burned into my mind.

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The Ultimate Weight Solution by Dr. Phil McGraw

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This book discusses seven key areas in the weigh loss journey.

  1. How to develop self-control
  2. How to control emotional eating 
  3. How to control external pressures
  4. How to develop new habits
  5. How to pick better foods
  6. How to develop an exercise program 
  7. How to develop a support system 

I enjoyed reading this book.  I also found the information to be helpful in my quest to loss weight and live a healthier lifestyle.

The Diabetes Reset by George L. King, M.D.

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I don’t have diabetes, but I decided to read this book anyway.  It is full of information on how to improve your diet and live a healthier lifestyle.

Dr. King is a huge advocate for the “Rural Asian Diet.”  This is a diet of mostly high-fiber carbohydrates, fruits, and vegetables.  This diet helps with weight loss and reduces risk of diabetes or can help control diabetes.

He also talked about the importance of monitoring and recording your calorie intake to help maintain a healthy weight.

I enjoyed reading this book and would recommend it to anyone interesting in living a healthy lifestyle.

 

Thinking at the Cemetery

The oldest graveyard in Athens, Alabama, is a block from the courthouse and is known as Old City Cemetery.  Most of the graves are unreadable and many of them have been damaged over the years.  However, the grave of John Craig received a new marker recently.  He was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, so his grave has been maintained over the years.

I was sitting in the cemetery looking at his grave and wondering about his life.  His world was filled with uncertainty.  The American Colonies were going to war with England (a world super-power at the time).

If the war was lost, he could be executed for treasonous acts.  If the war was won, his world would still be filled with upheaval and unknown circumstances.  He would be living in a brand new country that was trying to establish a government.

I wonder what he must have thought about his future possibilities.  Did he think about future generations and how much his actions would effect them?  Was he afraid of the unknown future?  Was he filled with feelings of invincibility and the optimism of youth?

John Craig was fighting a war for a country that was only a dream at the time.  He was willing to die, for the idea of a free land and an independent nation.

His willingness to fight and give his life, if necessary, is still honored today.  His grave marker is maintained and replaced when needed.

Did he ever wonder if he would be remembered by generations that would be born hundreds of years in future?  Could he even imagine the idea of someone sitting at his grave thinking about his life in the year 2016?

Weeden House Museum – Huntsville, Alabama

I throughly enjoyed my visit to the Weeden House Museum.  There are a lot of interesting things to see and the tour guide did a fabulous job.

The Weeden House was built in 1819, by H.C. Bradford.  The intricate woodwork and the federal architectural style is stunning.  The Weeden family owned the home from 1845 to 1956.

Maria Howard Weeden (1846-1905) lived in this house her entire life.  She was a poet and an artist.  Maira was particularly interested in the lives of the black people she encountered on a regular basis.  She was bothered by the way they were treated and wanted to give them a voice in the world.

Maria Howard Weeden painted realistic portraits of the black people, instead of the cartoonish images that were popular during the Reconstruction period.

Maria also spent hours talking to the black people she painted, so she could learn their life stories.

Maria used poetry to expose the horrible circumstances of their lives.  The rhythm and cadence reflected the positive personalities of the people, in spite of their lifelong suffering.

Maria Howard Weeden was truly a woman ahead of her time.