Using a Mercedes SUV as a Farm Vehicle

In Alabama, if you have a working farm you can register your vehicles (tractors, trucks, and any other vehicles that may end up on the road) as being used for farm work.  Since farm vehicles are not charged the same fees, this will allow you to save hundreds of dollars in registration cost.

My mom was driving me to the store to pick up some medication and we got behind a Mercedes with a farm vehicle tag.

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The Mercedes is an SUV and I admit I don’t know anything about the owner of the vehicle or what they do for a living.  I don’t like snapping to rash judgements about people without knowing any of the facts.

I am just saying, if I worked at the Department of Motor Vehicles and someone came in to  register their Mercedes as a farm vehicle (even if it is an SUV) I would be very suspicious.

 

Making Friends at Mac Resource Store

I had to take my laptop to Mac Resource Store, because I accidentally got droplets of glue from a spray can on the keyboard.  When I picked up my laptop, I was still wearing my bandages from the surgery.

The employee that helped me checkout is named Eric and he asked about the bandages.  That’s how we got to talking about ear surgeries.  Turns out, Eric also has hearing loss and he got a BAHA implant a few years ago.  We talked a little bit about the surgery and other surgeries.  We both had mastoidectomies done and we have even seen some of the same doctors.

I had a great time talking with Eric, because I don’t know anyone who has undergone similar surgeries as me.  When I get the outer processor for the BAHA, I am going to visit Eric again, so we can compare thoughts on the device.

It may sound funny, but I am kind of glad I messed up my keyboard.  I got to meet a great person that I can relate to in a way I have never done before.

 

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Battle for Decatur, Alabama

Decatur is located on the banks of the Tennessee River.  During the Civil War, it was a key transportation point, because both the Memphis and Charleston railroads crossed the Tennessee River in Decatur.  Decatur also had a national road (US Highway 31) that went through the city.

The Confederates were determined to stop the Union Army from taking the city.  They knew without Decatur it would be extremely difficult for the Union to get supplies, artillery, and reinforcements to their troops.

The Confederate Army fought fiercely for four days with General Hood in command.  General Hood was confident that Decatur would not fall to the Union Army.  He said, Decatur was a “hard nut to crack.”  General Hood employed the use of mounted troops, gunboats, and a vast number of infantrymen.

General Robert Granger was in command of the Union troops, which included the 14th United States Colored Troops (USCT) led by Colonel Thomas Morgan.  The USCT was able to drive back the Confederate troops and take control of the city.

Most of Decatur was destroyed during the war and only five buildings remained.  Four of those buildings are still standing today:  the Old State Bank, the Dancy-Polk House, the Todd House, and the McEntire Home.

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Source:  Decatur Convention and Visitors Bureau

 

5th Race Completed

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I completed my fifth charity race today.  The race was called “Out Run Hunger.”  It raised money for House of Harvest, which is a food pantry in Harvest, Alabama.

At the end of a race, I always feel like I am about to puke.  However, there is something about crossing that finish line and hearing people congratulate me for completing the race.  It motivates me to workout more, so I can improve my time.  It also makes me excited for the next race.

This is how my race schedule has gone so far:

  • 1st race was 1 mile and I came in last
  • 2nd race was 5k and I came in last
  • 3rd race was 5k and I came in second to last
  • 4th race was 4k and there were 6 people that finished after me
  • 5th race was 5k and I came in last