American Indian Genealogy Research

I took a class on researching American Indian ancestors at the Huntsville Madison County Public Library.  It was an introductory course, but I learned a great deal about the topic.

The instructor showed us how to use Ancestory.com to research federal and state census records.  We also researched the Indian census rolls conducted by the Department of Indian Affairs.  This department was founded in the late 1800’s, and was responsible for tracking the Indian population.

The teacher explained the significance of the Dawes Commission Records and showed us how to access that information.  The Oklahoma Historical Society website has the completed records and provides an easy search engine for research purposes.

The class ended with a discussion about other records that might help people find information about their American Indian ancestors, such as:

  • Indian Removal Records
  • Indian School Records
  • Will and Probate Records
  • Church Records
  • Bureau of Indian Affairs Records
  • Military Records
  • Employment Records

Old Family Photos and Family Legacy

A few days ago, I posted a couple of photos of Mom and Aunt Kathy.  While I was looking for those pictures, I came across a few photos of my grandparents (Frank and Edith Lynn) and my great-grandparents (Otis and Ollie Lynn).

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I look at these photos and wonder about their lives.  They were just doing normal things, going to school, getting married, raising their children, and working at various jobs.

However, time moves quickly.  Their children grew up, moved away, and had their own children.  Those children also grew up, moved away, and had their own children.  And so it continued….

My great-grandparents and grandparents are no longer living.  However, their legacy is still here.  It continues through stories, pictures, even some character traits that seem to be genetic in nature.

Even when there is nobody left that remembers them, their legacy will continue to live on in our family.