Wondering About Old Houses

I like looking at old houses.

I wonder about the people that lived in the house when it was sparkling new.  Did they have fancy parties?  Was there a beautiful horse and buggy that would roll up to the front door?

How many families have called this place home over the years?  Did anyone ever die in that house?  Was anyone ever murdered in that house?

What secrets does the house know?

Does anyone else think about such things?  Maybe it’s just me.  Maybe I’m just weird.




My family and I went to Firehouse Antiques in Huntsville, Alabama.

The store is massive.  It seemed like every doorway opened into another large bay, and around every corner I found even more aisles filled with items (and that was just on the first floor).

It’s a great place to visit and I would like to go again, because there is no way to see everything in just trip.

Alabama War Museum

The Alabama War Museum is located in Madison, Alabama.  The museum is small; however, it has an impressive variety of artifacts and historical items.  They have rotating exhibits that change several times a year, so each visit is an adventure.  Also, the gift shop is amazing and full of unique items.



Library and Museum Indefinitely and Temporally Closed


The Houston Memorial Library and Museum is located in Athens, Alabama.  George Houston was the governor of Alabama and a US senator.

George Houston died in the 1870’s.  In the 1930’s, Houston’s family donated his house and property to the city of Athens.  The property was freely given, with the stipulation the city would create a library and museum.

The museum was filled with historical documents, books, and various artifacts.  I always enjoyed visiting, because I would find something I missed during my prior visit.  I also loved the atmosphere of rooms filled with old books and their smell permeating throughout the house.

Unfortunately, the building was not properly maintained.  The house is no longer safe for the public to visit, so the city closed the Houston Museum and Library last year.

I am not optimistic about their plans.  The sign says it is, “Indefinitely and temporally closed for renovations,” which makes me cringe on so many levels.



Old Stuff Day

This is Old Stuff Day.  When I think about old stuff in my house, the first thing that comes to mind is this washboard.


My grandmother, Edith (Stevens) Lynn, purchased the washboard in 1957, from Carabaos Store in Anchorage, Alaska.  My grandfather was in the Army and he was stationed there at the time.

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It’s amazing to think about how different their lives were from mine.  I can’t even fathom how long it would take to do laundry for an entire family with a washboard or how much elbow grease was involved in that task.

Life for them was hard.  They moved constantly with the Army and sometimes spent less than one year at a location before moving again.  They raised four kids and would sacrifice to provide the best possible life for their children.

My mom remembers in the early years, when my grandfather was just a private, my grandmother would skip meals.  She sat at the table and said she wasn’t hungry.  However, the truth was she didn’t have enough food to feed everyone.  She decided her husband needed a good meal, since he was a soldier, and the children needed food to grow, be healthy, and do well in school.

The washboard now hangs in our laundry room, but it’s more than a decorative piece.  It is a reminder of my family legacy.

The sacrifice and hard work of my grandparents, gave my mom the chance at a good education and an example of how to survive in the world.

Mom passed that legacy down to her children.  Today my life successes are a reflection of that tradition and I try to teach Gwen the same values I learned from Mom.

It began over 60 years ago, a tradition of hard work, dedication, and love for your family.  It still continues to this day, thanks to my grandparents, Frank and Edith Lynn.