Caring for Others

If you are about to become a caregiver for someone, you need a plan.

  • Start the Conversation 
    • Look for an opening 
    • Respect your loved one’s wishes 
    • Size up the situation 
    • Review finances 
  • Form a team
    • Team members can help with simple or finite tasks 
    • They can use their talents and strengths 
    • Determine the number of people on your team 
    • Assign roles and responsibilities 
  • Make a plan 
    • Assess the goals and needs of your plan
    • Delegate responsibilities
    • Include the person receiving care 
    • Keep everyone informed 
    • Take notes 
  • Find Support
    • Community resources
    • Consult a professional
    • Hire help
    • Care for yourself

 

Source: Candace Williams, AARP, Caregiver College Presentation, 21 June 2019

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Aging and Disability: Transitions into Residential Care

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The book Aging and Disability:  Transitions into Residential Care is full of useful information that is presented in an organized and concise manner.

Here are a few of the main points:

There are certain personality traits that make it easier for people to successfully transition to residential care:  feeling in control of their lives, valuing strong bonds with friends/family, and viewing change as a challenge rather than as a threat.

The features of successful aging are:  having a sense of purpose, interacting with others, opportunities for personal growth, self-acceptance, and autonomy.

Once an individual is placed in residential care, they still need their family.  The family should be available to check on the quality of care their loved one is receiving, provide companionship, and assist with financial management needs.