Instruments in the Redeemer’s Hands

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This book teaches people in need of change to help people in need of change.  Here are a few interesting tips I discovered while reading Instruments in the Redeemer’s Hands.

  • Our eyes can be so focused on the problem that we miss the person and the struggles within.
  • We build relationships by identifying with suffering.
  • Enter their world, get to know what they are facing, and help them understand their resources in Christ to face their particular situation.

Road Map to Change

  1. Consideration – What does God what the person to see?
  2. Confession – What does God what the person to admit or confess?
  3. Commitment – To what new ways of living is God calling this person?
  4. Change – How should these new commitments be applied to daily living?

Change Takes Discipline

The dictionary defines change as, “to become different in some way, to change is to adjust develop, transform, or revise.”

However, you cannot have change without discipline.   

Discipline is defined as, “a system of rules of conduct or method of practice; to be disciplined is to have self-control, self-restraint, and self-mastery.”

Basically, change takes discipline.  The two work together.

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My First Pair of Reading Glasses

I recently bought my first pair of reading glasses.

I am not sure how I feel about this purchase.  I am 46 years old, but I don’t feel much different from how I felt 20 years ago.  Maybe so much time has past that I don’t remember what it felt like to be in my twenties.  Maybe I would be shocked if I was able to feel the difference for one day.

That’s how life goes.  Things are always changing and nothing ever stays the same.

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The Orange Conference 2017 – Seven Habits of Emotionally Healthy Leaders

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During the Orange Conference, Craig Jutila lead a breakout session called, “Seven Habits of Emotionally Healthy Leaders.”

The presentation was interesting and funny at times.  I could relate to a lot of what Craig Jutila had to say, so I decide to share my notes on my blog.

Seven Habits of Emotionally Healthy Leaders by Craig Jutila:

  1.  Forgetfulness – Forget your past failures, forget negative comments, and forget your past successes
  2. Connectedness – Connect with people, connect with a champion that encourages you, connect with a friend that knows you and still loves you, and connect with a mentor that can speak truth into your life
  3. Allness – Be here now, be all here, and be present in the moment
  4. Lightheartedness – It’s ok to laugh and have fun
  5. Awareness – Be aware of your internal narrative, be socially aware, also be aware of the feelings, needs, behaviors, and concerns of other people
  6. Selectiveness – Be selective in what you do each day, because saying yes to the good things, may cause you to say no to the better things
  7. Adaptableness – Be willing to change and adapt, also shift your thinking from what will I lose to what will I gain

The Ancient Guide to Modern Life

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Natalie Haynes is the author of, “The Ancient Guide to Modern Life.”  In the book, she talks about ancient philosophy, modern philosophy, their similarities, and how we can apply those ideas to our own lives.

In the section covering politics, Natalie Haynes said:

“Why stand outside something with a placard when you could be changing it from within?  The Athenians should inspire us to become school governors, patient representatives, local councillors, and members of Parliament.  They should persuade us to stop shrugging and sighing when we could instead be improving our lot.”

I am guilty of complaining about social problems and then doing nothing to improve the situation.  How can I expect others to fix something, when I am not willing to do any of the work?

I know I can do better.  I know I can help change things.  It is time to stop sitting around and complaining about everything.  It is time to get up and get to work.