Bariatric Mindset Success

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Kristin Lloyd is a social worker that struggled with her weight, so she had bariatric surgery.  She now offers counseling to others who are going through the surgery process.

She is relatable and her vast experience makes her a great candidate to teach others about bariatric surgery.  In her book, she shares her personal experiences, advice on how to succeed, and warnings about common pitfalls.

My favorite quote from the book is, “Having weight loss surgery is the first step in breaking out of the victim cycle, because this means you are acting and doing something to take back control over yourself and your life.”

Having Surgery and Feeling the Love

Yesterday, I had surgery to repair a torn ligament in my knee.  The surgery went well and now I am home recovering.

A few days ago, I told Gwen I was actually looking forward to the surgery, because I am tired of my knee hurting all the time.  Gwen responded, “I’m looking forward to the surgery too, because I am tired of hearing you complain about your knee hurting all the time.”

I’m feeling the love.  LOL

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The Sleeved Life by Pennie Nicola

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Pennie Nicola had gastric sleeve surgery and wrote this book to help others who are considering the surgery or who have recently had the surgery.  Her book is full of useful advice on how to decide if the surgery is right for you, picking a surgeon, and on how to succeed after the surgery.

She sums up her book with seven rules for the sleeved life.

  1.  East less than full capacity
  2. Never eat and drink at the same time
  3. Exercise 4-6 times a week
  4. Keep carbs low
  5. Eat protein first
  6. Drink a lot of water
  7. Allow 20-30 minutes for a meal

Not Your Average Runner by Jill Angie

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Jill Angie is “not your average runner.”  In her book she shares her personal failures and triumphs as a runner.  She also gives advice on how to get started, training for beginners, and running gear.

This book is entertaining, easy to read, and inspirational.  I recommend it to anyone that wants to start a new exercise program, but feels embarrassed by their current weight.

 

You Can’t Afford the Luxury of a Negative Thought by John-Roger and Peter McWilliams

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I found this book in the free bin at 2nd and Charles.  The title intrigued me, so I decided to read it.

The premise of the book can be summed up in this one quote,

“Right now, in this moment, without moving from where you are, you can find ample evidence to prove your life is miserable, depressing, and a terrible burden, or you can find evidence to prove your life is an abundant, joyful, exciting adventure.”

The book contains information on how to change you perspective and on how to deal with difficult situations.  It was an interesting read and I am glad I gave it a chance.

Friends With Similar Disabilities

I stumbled across this news article the other day.

http://www.wbtv.com/story/38883711/hearing-aids-lead-to-unique-friendship-at-madison-county-elementary-school

To sum it up, a forth grader with a hearing disability saw a kindergartner wearing hearing aids, so he went up the kindergartner and introduced himself.  The kindergartner was thrilled to meet another child with hearing aids.

The two boys have become friends, due to their shared experience.  They are able to work together to teach other kids about their disability and how hearing aids work.

They can also help each other navigate through obstacles and pitfalls that occur when you have a hearing disability in childhood.

This article touched my heart, because I too have a hearing disability that started in early childhood.  I wasn’t lucky enough to meet another hearing disabled child, so I often struggled alone.

Even as an adult, if I run into a young person with a hearing aid I feel an immediate connection.  I want to talk to them about their experiences, how they handle certain situations, and how having a hearing disability has impacted their life.

Growing up with a hearing impairment is a unique experience and not something most people can understand.  I am glad these boys found each other.

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