The Sleeved Life by Pennie Nicola

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Pennie Nicola had gastric sleeve surgery and wrote this book to help others who are considering the surgery or who have recently had the surgery.  Her book is full of useful advice on how to decide if the surgery is right for you, picking a surgeon, and on how to succeed after the surgery.

She sums up her book with seven rules for the sleeved life.

  1.  East less than full capacity
  2. Never eat and drink at the same time
  3. Exercise 4-6 times a week
  4. Keep carbs low
  5. Eat protein first
  6. Drink a lot of water
  7. Allow 20-30 minutes for a meal

Not Your Average Runner by Jill Angie

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Jill Angie is “not your average runner.”  In her book she shares her personal failures and triumphs as a runner.  She also gives advice on how to get started, training for beginners, and running gear.

This book is entertaining, easy to read, and inspirational.  I recommend it to anyone that wants to start a new exercise program, but feels embarrassed by their current weight.

 

You Can’t Afford the Luxury of a Negative Thought by John-Roger and Peter McWilliams

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I found this book in the free bin at 2nd and Charles.  The title intrigued me, so I decided to read it.

The premise of the book can be summed up in this one quote,

“Right now, in this moment, without moving from where you are, you can find ample evidence to prove your life is miserable, depressing, and a terrible burden, or you can find evidence to prove your life is an abundant, joyful, exciting adventure.”

The book contains information on how to change you perspective and on how to deal with difficult situations.  It was an interesting read and I am glad I gave it a chance.

Friends With Similar Disabilities

I stumbled across this news article the other day.

http://www.wbtv.com/story/38883711/hearing-aids-lead-to-unique-friendship-at-madison-county-elementary-school

To sum it up, a forth grader with a hearing disability saw a kindergartner wearing hearing aids, so he went up the kindergartner and introduced himself.  The kindergartner was thrilled to meet another child with hearing aids.

The two boys have become friends, due to their shared experience.  They are able to work together to teach other kids about their disability and how hearing aids work.

They can also help each other navigate through obstacles and pitfalls that occur when you have a hearing disability in childhood.

This article touched my heart, because I too have a hearing disability that started in early childhood.  I wasn’t lucky enough to meet another hearing disabled child, so I often struggled alone.

Even as an adult, if I run into a young person with a hearing aid I feel an immediate connection.  I want to talk to them about their experiences, how they handle certain situations, and how having a hearing disability has impacted their life.

Growing up with a hearing impairment is a unique experience and not something most people can understand.  I am glad these boys found each other.

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Basic Healthy Nutritional Guidelines

  1.  Eat three meals a day at regular times to maintain blood sugar and prevent overeating.
  2. Snacks should be used when meals will be more than 4 hours apart.
  3. Balance your plate with 1/4 carbohydrates, 1/4 protein, and 1/2 vegetables/fruit.
  4. Take small bites and chew your food thoroughly (at least 20 times).
  5. Measure your food according to serving size recommendations.
  6. Avoid high-sugar foods and decrease desserts to no more than once a week.
  7. Practice mindful eating by eating at a table and turning off distractions.
  8. Consume 60 to 80 grams of protein daily.
  9. Consume at least 64 ounces of water daily.

 

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Source:  Crestwood Medical Center in Huntsville, Alabama 

Major Depression Feels Like….

Major depression feels like:

  • You are drowning and you reach up for help, but no-one is there.
  • You have to act calm on the outside, but inside you are screaming in agony.
  • You are trapped in a cage and you are pacing back and forth like an animal.
  • You have a pressure cooker inside your body and it is about to explode.
  • You are alone in the world, because you are unable to connect to people.  You cannot relate to them and they cannot relate to you.
  • There’s a dark cloud looming over you.
  • There’s a monster inside of you and it is crushing your soul.