Taking Drastic Measures

I’ve battled with my weight most of my life.  Over the years, I managed to lose up to a 100 pounds only to regain the weight.

That’s when I decided to take drastic measures.  I called a surgeon and asked about bariatric surgery.

Before the surgery date, I had to participate in a weight loss program, talk with a nutritionist, get a psychiatric evaluation, and there were few other things that needed to be accomplished.

I managed to meet all those goals and my insurance company gave their approval.  I had the surgery last Thursday (16 August).

I am looking forward to starting my new life, now that I have the tools to succeed.

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Breaking Addiction – A 7 Step Handbook for Ending Any Addiction by Lance Dodes, MD

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According to Dr. Lance Dodes, our current treatment model for addiction is ineffective.  In many cases, people are sent to programs that deal with addiction only and then sent to a different program to treat their mental health issues.  This fragmented treatment plan ignores the fact that addiction doesn’t happen in a vacuum.

Addiction persists, because it serves a purpose.  The addictive behavior is often intended to reverse a profound feelings of helplessness and powerlessness.  Addressing those feelings is key to treating addiction.

The drive behind addiction tends to be rage and feelings of being trapped.  This rage compounds the feelings of helplessness, so addiction becomes a displaced action.  Addiction is a symptom of deeper psychological problems.

The book lists seven steps for overcoming addiction.

Step 1 – Understand addiction as behavior driven by psychological/emotional distress

Step 2 – Addictions are compulsive behaviors and need to be treated through therapy which allows the person to gain a better understanding of themselves.

Step 3 – Recognize key moments in the addiction processes.  The thoughts and feelings that drive addictive behavior are clues to the cause and treatment options for the addictive behavior.

Step 4 – Recognize your defenses that hide the root cause of your addiction.  Look for the feelings and thoughts that are driving you.

Step 5 – Understand what is happening at the key moment, what’s the trigger.  What are the corresponding feelings that make you feel helpless or powerless?

Step 6 – Develop short-term strategies to deal with triggers and emotional distress.  Ask yourself why you are thinking about your addiction and look for alternative behaviors.  Restore feelings of power by finding a practical way out of the trap.  If you can’t change your circumstances, focus on the feelings and learn to deal with those feelings.

Step 7 – Eliminate or reduce feelings of powerlessness and helplessness by being an expert on yourself.  Also, learn to identify high risk situations.  Knowing the risks in advance allows you to prepare for it.

Make Exercise Fun

Exercise doesn’t have to be boring.  There are a lot of different things you can do that are fun and will add variety to your workout routine.

  1. Bike Riding
  2. Laser Tag
  3. Volleyball
  4. Jump on a Trampoline
  5. Scavenger Hunt
  6. Flag Football
  7. Hiking
  8. Bowling
  9. Swimming
  10. Obstacle Course
  11. Mini Golf
  12. Frisbee
  13. Hopscotch
  14. Batting Cage
  15. Kayaking/Canoeing
  16. Daning
  17. LAPRing (Live Action Role-Play)
  18. Geocaching
  19. Marital Arts
  20. Yoga
  21. Active Video Games
  22. Walk a Dog
  23. Volleyball
  24. Rollerblading/Skating

If you have other ideas, please let me know in the comment section.

FunFitness

Physical Activity Recommendations

Physical activity plays a major role in promoting good health and is an excellent way to boost your mood.

  1. You should participate in physical activities for at least 150 minutes a week (20 minutes a day or for 30 minutes 5 days a week).
  2. You can break exercise time into small chucks throughout the day.
  3. Eliminate all or nothing thinking.
  4. You can multitask while exercising (for example:  watch TV while on a treadmill).
  5. Make your exercise time a priority.

 

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Source:  Crestwood Medical Center in Huntsville, Alabama

Treating Poison Ivy

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I was walking through thick brush and not paying attention to the foliage around me, until my legs became insnared by a thorn bush.  I looked down and noticed I was surrounded by poison ivy.

My legs had multiple welts and were extremely itchy.  A friend recommended washing my legs in rubbing alcohol, because it will dry up the welts and remove all the poison from my skin.

I was skeptical, but willing to give it a try.  To my amazement the rubbing alcohol did a fantastic job.  I can still see a few spots on my legs, but they do not itch at all.

If you ever end up with poison ivy, try rubbing alcohol.  It works wonders.

Aging by Design

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According to Theodore Goldsmith he wrote Aging by Design because, “We cannot hope to understand or most effectively treat and prevent age-related diseases without understanding aging.”

The author covers two modern theories for why we age.  He discusses the pros, cons, and implications for each theory.

  1.  In the programmed aging theories, organisms purposely self-limit their lifespans and processes what amount to suicide mechanisms to accomplish this function.
  2. Aging is the result of the body’s inability to better combat deteriorative processes that affect all organized systems, such as wear-and-tear, oxidation, other molecular damage, or accumulation of toxic byproducts.

Before, reading this book I never considered the benefits of age related research or how that research could help find cures for common diseases that plague mankind.  This book  was eye-opening and put medical research in a whole new light for me.

I highly recommend this book.

Aging and Disability: Transitions into Residential Care

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The book Aging and Disability:  Transitions into Residential Care is full of useful information that is presented in an organized and concise manner.

Here are a few of the main points:

There are certain personality traits that make it easier for people to successfully transition to residential care:  feeling in control of their lives, valuing strong bonds with friends/family, and viewing change as a challenge rather than as a threat.

The features of successful aging are:  having a sense of purpose, interacting with others, opportunities for personal growth, self-acceptance, and autonomy.

Once an individual is placed in residential care, they still need their family.  The family should be available to check on the quality of care their loved one is receiving, provide companionship, and assist with financial management needs.