The Broken BAHA

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I broke my BAHA again and it will take 7 to 10 days for it to be fixed.

I have a conflicting relationship with my BAHA.  I actually prefer going without it.  I like living in my own quit world.  However, I cannot communicate with people if I am not wearing my BAHA.  I need it to function.

Without my BAHA, I have to struggle through every conversation.  I have to focus and pour all my energy into understanding what is being said.  It’s exhausting.

I just want to hide away in my room until my BAHA is fixed.  I don’t want to see people or deal with the public at large.

 

BAHA Free Week

I spent a week without my BAHA (Bone Anchored Hearing Aid) and it was not easy.

I would try to focus on every word people were saying, but I still missed a good bit of it.  I would then have to fill in the blanks as best I could.  I was constantly asking people to repeat themselves.  It was exhausting.

Most people are not used to communicating with someone that has a severe hearing disability.  They forget to look directly at me, so I can read their lips.  They also start talking without getting my attention.  I may not even know they are speaking to me.

I finally got my BAHA back and I am excited to be able to function again.

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Friends With Similar Disabilities

I stumbled across this news article the other day.

http://www.wbtv.com/story/38883711/hearing-aids-lead-to-unique-friendship-at-madison-county-elementary-school

To sum it up, a forth grader with a hearing disability saw a kindergartner wearing hearing aids, so he went up the kindergartner and introduced himself.  The kindergartner was thrilled to meet another child with hearing aids.

The two boys have become friends, due to their shared experience.  They are able to work together to teach other kids about their disability and how hearing aids work.

They can also help each other navigate through obstacles and pitfalls that occur when you have a hearing disability in childhood.

This article touched my heart, because I too have a hearing disability that started in early childhood.  I wasn’t lucky enough to meet another hearing disabled child, so I often struggled alone.

Even as an adult, if I run into a young person with a hearing aid I feel an immediate connection.  I want to talk to them about their experiences, how they handle certain situations, and how having a hearing disability has impacted their life.

Growing up with a hearing impairment is a unique experience and not something most people can understand.  I am glad these boys found each other.

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Texting vs Talking on the Phone

I have a hearing disability, so talking on the phone is a struggle.  I have to concentrate on every word the other person is saying, but I still end up missing a good bit of the conversation.  It’s extremely frustrating for me to have a phone conversation.

However, texting is a breeze.  The words are right there for me to read and with the use of emojis the context and emotions behind those words is understandable.

Which do you prefer, texting or talking on the phone?

BAHA Update

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I’ve worn the BAHA (Bone Anchored Hearing Aid) implant for a couple of months now, so I thought I would write an updated review.

On the plus side, I am hearing a lot better with the implant.  The other day, I was listening to crickets.  I thought it was so funny that they sound like birds.  I also find it easier to communicate with people.  A few times, I even understood what someone behind me said.  That was cool.

On the negative side, the outer processor is very delicate.  I can’t wear it when I am engaging in any physical activity.  I also can’t wear a hat with the outer processor.  That has been frustrating for me, since it limits my ability to use the BAHA implant.

I would still recommend the BAHA implant to anyone that needs it.  It is a great device and I enjoy having it.