Bowling History

I was wondering about the history of bowling the other day, so I did a little research.  Bowling may not be the most popular sport, but it has been around a long time.

  • Archaeologist discovered a primitive bowling ball and bowling pins in the grave of an Egyptian boy (dated around 3200 BCE).
  • There is a lawn bowling site in South Hampton, England, which records show has been operational since 1299.
  • In 1841, bowling became illegal in Connecticut, because it was associated with gambling and crime.
  • The first indoor bowling alley in America, was built in 1840, in New York City.

Source:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bowling

Humorous History

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My favorite section of Humorous History was about King Henry VIII of England.

He had three “Grooms of Stool” that were responsible for wiping his bottom.  This job was not all bad, because he rewarded his “Grooms of Stool” with money, land, and official titles.

In spite of all that, wiping a grown man’s butt sounds like a horrible job.

 

The Black Death and Nostradamus

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This book has a section addressing Nostradamus and his role in society during the plague years.  According to the author:

Nostradamus was a plague doctor.  Of all recovered information about cures and practices, his were by far the most practical compared with medical standards today.  He recommends against blood-letting and advocated clean water, clean air, and immediate removal of infected corpses. 

This was new information for me and I thought it was interesting.

April Fool’s Day History

April Fool’s Day goes back to the 1500s.  Most scholars believe it started when the calendar changed from Julian to Gregorian, due to the Council of Trent.

Some people were slow in receiving the news, so they celebrated New Year’s the last week of March until April 1.  They were teased and became the victims of various hoaxes.

The popularity of April Fool’s Day soared in England in the 1700s.  Pranksters would play practical jokes on each other.

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source:  www.history.com/this-day-in-history/april-fools-tradition-popularized

Homicide House

Reposted from 25 February 2017

Twenty years ago, there was a quadruple homicide in this house.  The victims were teenagers and they were killed for accusing a young man of stealing a cell phone.

The guilty individual, as well as his two accomplices, were convicted and the house was eventually abandoned.

I drive by this house all the time and this week I was compelled to look inside of it.  It’s hard to describe how I felt entering the house.

There was a mixture of sadness and grief, due to the senseless murders that happened here.  I can’t even imagine how those poor teenagers felt as they realized their lives were coming to an end.  Also, I felt angry.  How can someone be so evil and callused?

I didn’t know the teenagers, but I feel for them and their families.  I wonder what they would have accomplished if their lives were not taken from them.

I left the house with a heavy heart and a lot of questions.

Update:  The house has been torn down since this was originally posted.

 

Parking Meter History

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Several years ago, I decided to read about the history of parking meters.  I know, it doesn’t exactly sound like a thriller.  However, it was interesting.

What really surprised me was the location of the first parking meter.  I would have guessed an extremely large city like New York or Chicago.  I was wrong.  The first parking meter was installed in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.  Go figure….

 

 

Battle for Decatur, Alabama

Decatur is located on the banks of the Tennessee River.  During the Civil War, it was a key transportation point, because both the Memphis and Charleston railroads crossed the Tennessee River in Decatur.  Decatur also had a national road (US Highway 31) that went through the city.

The Confederates were determined to stop the Union Army from taking the city.  They knew without Decatur it would be extremely difficult for the Union to get supplies, artillery, and reinforcements to their troops.

The Confederate Army fought fiercely for four days with General Hood in command.  General Hood was confident that Decatur would not fall to the Union Army.  He said, Decatur was a “hard nut to crack.”  General Hood employed the use of mounted troops, gunboats, and a vast number of infantrymen.

General Robert Granger was in command of the Union troops, which included the 14th United States Colored Troops (USCT) led by Colonel Thomas Morgan.  The USCT was able to drive back the Confederate troops and take control of the city.

Most of Decatur was destroyed during the war and only five buildings remained.  Four of those buildings are still standing today:  the Old State Bank, the Dancy-Polk House, the Todd House, and the McEntire Home.

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Source:  Decatur Convention and Visitors Bureau