Censorship Doesn’t Equal Freedom

It bothers me when people demand their right to free speech, while at the same time trying to censor contradictory opinions.  I see this coming from both sides of the fence.

However, you can’t have freedom of speech and censorship.  They are contradictory terms.  Allowing this behavior will erode our freedoms and in the end we all lose.

What are your thoughts on this matter?

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Constitution Survey

I conducted a survey and asked 100 people if they have ever read the entire US Constitution.  Honestly, I was surprised by the results.  I expected a lot more negative responses.

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The main purpose of the survey was to get people thinking about the Constitution and hopefully inspire them to read it.  How can we ensure our rights and freedoms remain, if we don’t know what we are entitled to as American citizens?

 

Living With the Enemy

I spent my childhood (from 1974-1978 and 1980-1987) in Germany, because my father was in the Army.  This was during the cold war and Russia was our sworn enemy.  We were in Germany protecting the world from communism and the evil Russians.

In 1997, I ended up moving to Russia.  Things had changed a lot since my childhood.  The wall had collapsed and Russia was no longer a communist country.

It felt strange to be in Russia, to be in a country I was taught to hate, to mingle with people I viewed as enemies.

While I was in Russia, I made friends and I learned they were a lot like me.  They too had been taught to fear and hate, just as I had been.  They too were curious about life on the other side of the wall.  They had many of the same desires and hopes for the future as I did.  We weren’t that different at the core of our being, and I was able to make friends with those I used to view as enemies.

 

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What happened to the Neanderthals?

It was originally believed the Neanderthals were killed by humans that migrated out of Africa.  However, recent evidence from genetic studies prove humans and Neanderthals were interbreeding.

Researchers at National Geographic discovered, “the Neanderthal linage disappeared, because it was absorbed into the much larger human population.”  They found Neanderthal DNA in humans, especially in those with a strong European heritage.

Basically, the Neanderthals intermingled with humans until they were breed out of existence.

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Source:  Genographic Project:  nationalgeogrpahic.com

 

Sitting in a Cemetery

The oldest graveyard in Athens, Alabama, is a block from the courthouse and is known as Old City Cemetery.  Most of the graves are unreadable and many have been damaged over the years.

However, the grave of John Craig received a new marker recently.  He was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, so his grave has been maintained over the years.

I was sitting in the cemetery looking at his grave and wondering about his life.  His world was filled with uncertainty.  The American Colonies were going to war with England (a world super-power at the time).

If the war was lost, he could be executed for treasonous acts.  If the war was won, his world would still be filled with upheaval and unknown circumstances.  He would be living in a brand new country that was trying to establish a government.

I wonder what he must have thought about his future possibilities.  Did he think about future generations and how much his actions would effect them?  Was he afraid of the unknown future?  Was he filled with feelings of invincibility and the optimism of youth?

John Craig was fighting for a country that was only a dream at the time.  He was willing to die, for the idea of a free and independent nation.

His willingness to fight and give his life, if necessary, is still honored today.

Historic Storage Building

Prior to the desegregation of the Alabama school system, this building was a school for African-American children.  Students from multiple counties would travel to this school, since there only a few available in North Alabama.

Researching the history of this school and the building was not easy.  There is very little information about it on the internet and most of what I learned came from the local people.

The building is now being used as a storage facility and is not being maintained well.
That seems like such a waste to me.  Here we have a building with great historical significance, just wasting away in obscurity.

If I could purchase the property, I would turn it into a civil rights museum.  That seems to be a better way of honoring the history of this site.

What makes something valuable to you?

What makes something valuable to you?

  • How much the item cost
  • How hard it was to obtain the item
  • The memories attached to the item
  • The age of the item
  • The historical significance of the item
  • The popularity of the item
  • The usefulness of the item

To me, an item is valuable for a number of reasons.  The most important being usefulness and the memories attached to it.

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