Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff

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This is an excellent book that teaches the reader how to live peacefully in a complicated world.  The author starts the book by making three key points.

  1. The need for perfection and the desire for inner tranquility conflict with each other.
  2. Without, patience, life is extremely frustrating.  You are easily annoyed, bothered, and irritated.  Patience adds a dimension of ease and acceptance to your life.  It’s essential for inner peace.
  3. Humility and inner peace go hand in hand.  The less compelled you are to prove yourself to others, the easier it is to feel peaceful inside.

The rest of the book is spent giving detailed information on how to deal the various situations without losing your inner peace.  It’s full of practical advice and I highly recommend it.

 

Beyond the Box by Judith Rich, Ph.D.

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Do you ever feel like your life is stuck in a rut?  If so, this book is for you.  The author provides tips on how to improve your life and thought patterns.  Here are a few examples:

  1. Develop your courage muscles by doing something everyday that scares the heck out of you.
  2. Consider your available options, and choose one that stretches and empowers you.
  3. Take action based on making the choice that empowers and inspires you to move forward.
  4. Mistakes are where learning happens, so don’t be afraid of making them.

Affirmations

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I just finished reading The 100 Most Powerful Affirmations for Social Problems by Jason Thomas.  The writer starts by explaining how affirmations work.  He also said affirmations should be positive and actionable.

Here are a few examples:

  • I am strong in my values and confident in my abilities.
  • I have the ability to plan, organize, and do.
  • I am resilient and fierce.
  • I have the power within me to create the life I desire.

I must admit, the whole thing seems a bit silly to me.  Has anyone actually tried using affirmations?  If so, did you notice any benefit?

Who Controls You?

Who controls you?  Do you have an internal or an external locus of control?

Those who believe outside forces completely determine what will happen to them, have an external locus of control.  They view obstacles as insurmountable and believe they are unable to change their life circumstances.

Those who believe they can impact their life through their own actions, have an internal locus of control.  They are not immune to unfortunate  events, trauma, or other obstacles.  However, they focus on finding solutions to their problems.

It is important to notice, bad things happen to people in both groups.  The difference is in how they view negative events and in how they deal with the problems created by those events.

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Old Stuff Day

This is Old Stuff Day.  When I think about old stuff in my house, the first thing that comes to mind is this washboard.

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My grandmother, Edith (Stevens) Lynn, purchased the washboard in 1957, from Carabaos Store in Anchorage, Alaska.  My grandfather was in the Army and he was stationed there at the time.

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It’s amazing to think about how different their lives were from mine.  I can’t even fathom how long it would take to do laundry for an entire family with a washboard or how much elbow grease was involved in that task.

Life for them was hard.  They moved constantly with the Army and sometimes spent less than one year at a location before moving again.  They raised four kids and would sacrifice to provide the best possible life for their children.

My mom remembers in the early years, when my grandfather was just a private, my grandmother would skip meals.  She sat at the table and said she wasn’t hungry.  However, the truth was she didn’t have enough food to feed everyone.  She decided her husband needed a good meal, since he was a soldier, and the children needed food to grow, be healthy, and do well in school.

The washboard now hangs in our laundry room, but it’s more than a decorative piece.  It is a reminder of my family legacy.

The sacrifice and hard work of my grandparents, gave my mom the chance at a good education and an example of how to survive in the world.

Mom passed that legacy down to her children.  Today my life successes are a reflection of that tradition and I try to teach Gwen the same values I learned from Mom.

It began over 60 years ago, a tradition of hard work, dedication, and love for your family.  It still continues to this day, thanks to my grandparents, Frank and Edith Lynn.