Forced Childhood Vaccination

With the current measles outbreak in our country, I started to wonder if the government should force parents to vaccinate their children for the safety of the child and the general public.

While it may sound radical, forcing medical treatments against the parent’s wishes is not without precedent.

In 2015, a Hartford, Connecticut, teenager was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s Lymphoma.  With treatment her chances of recovery would be 85%; however, without treatment the condition is 100% lethal within two years.

Her parents rejected conventional treatments, so the state stepped in and forced the child to receive chemotherapy.  She survived and is now in remission (1).

Members of the Jehovah’s Witness church will refuse blood transfusions for religious reasons.  However, the state has forced the parents to allow their children to receive transfusions in emergency situations.

What about the parent’s rights to raise their children as they wish?  The courts have already made a determination on this issue.

  • Courts throughout the western world recognize that parents have rights but additionally recognize that these rights are not absolute and exist only to promote the welfare of children.  Prince v Massachusetts12 set out the reigning legal principle:  Parents may be free to become martyrs themselves. But it does not follow that they are free, in identical circumstances, to make martyrs of their children (2).

What are your thoughts on this matter?  Should parents be forced to have their children vaccinated?

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Sources:
  1.  www.cbsnews.com/news/teen-cancer-patient-forced-to-have-chemotherapy-in-remission
  2. adc.bmj.com/content/90/7/715

Virtual 5k’s

When I started my weight loss journey I was participating in 5k races.  I usually came in last, but I kept trying and was determined to improve.

Finally, I was able to get weight loss surgery.  I was excited, because I would be able to lose weight faster and increase my odds of winning in my category (females aged 45-49).

Unfortunately, I injured my knee.  The meniscus was torn in two places, the kneecap was damaged, and there were other issues.  I had surgery to repair the damage and was hoping for a full recovery.

However, the doctor said I shouldn’t run or do any high-impact activities on a regular basis.  My knee will always be sensitive and prone to injury.

I was depressed by this whole situation, until I discovered virtual 5k’s.  Basically, you register for the event online and complete the run on your own.  It can be done outdoors, on a treadmill, or even on an elliptical.

The elliptical is low impact and will not damage my knee, so this is great for me.  You can even get cool prizes for every event you complete.

Once again, I am excited to have something in which I can participate, get prizes, and feel proud of achieving.

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Having Surgery and Feeling the Love

Yesterday, I had surgery to repair a torn ligament in my knee.  The surgery went well and now I am home recovering.

A few days ago, I told Gwen I was actually looking forward to the surgery, because I am tired of my knee hurting all the time.  Gwen responded, “I’m looking forward to the surgery too, because I am tired of hearing you complain about your knee hurting all the time.”

I’m feeling the love.  LOL

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Friends With Similar Disabilities

I stumbled across this news article the other day.

http://www.wbtv.com/story/38883711/hearing-aids-lead-to-unique-friendship-at-madison-county-elementary-school

To sum it up, a forth grader with a hearing disability saw a kindergartner wearing hearing aids, so he went up the kindergartner and introduced himself.  The kindergartner was thrilled to meet another child with hearing aids.

The two boys have become friends, due to their shared experience.  They are able to work together to teach other kids about their disability and how hearing aids work.

They can also help each other navigate through obstacles and pitfalls that occur when you have a hearing disability in childhood.

This article touched my heart, because I too have a hearing disability that started in early childhood.  I wasn’t lucky enough to meet another hearing disabled child, so I often struggled alone.

Even as an adult, if I run into a young person with a hearing aid I feel an immediate connection.  I want to talk to them about their experiences, how they handle certain situations, and how having a hearing disability has impacted their life.

Growing up with a hearing impairment is a unique experience and not something most people can understand.  I am glad these boys found each other.

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Basic Healthy Nutritional Guidelines

  1.  Eat three meals a day at regular times to maintain blood sugar and prevent overeating.
  2. Snacks should be used when meals will be more than 4 hours apart.
  3. Balance your plate with 1/4 carbohydrates, 1/4 protein, and 1/2 vegetables/fruit.
  4. Take small bites and chew your food thoroughly (at least 20 times).
  5. Measure your food according to serving size recommendations.
  6. Avoid high-sugar foods and decrease desserts to no more than once a week.
  7. Practice mindful eating by eating at a table and turning off distractions.
  8. Consume 60 to 80 grams of protein daily.
  9. Consume at least 64 ounces of water daily.

 

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Source:  Crestwood Medical Center in Huntsville, Alabama