Physical Activity Recommendations

Physical activity plays a major role in promoting good health and is an excellent way to boost your mood.

  1. You should participate in physical activities for at least 150 minutes a week (20 minutes a day or for 30 minutes 5 days a week).
  2. You can break exercise time into small chucks throughout the day.
  3. Eliminate all or nothing thinking.
  4. You can multitask while exercising (for example:  watch TV while on a treadmill).
  5. Make your exercise time a priority.

 

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Source:  Crestwood Medical Center in Huntsville, Alabama

Treating Poison Ivy

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I was walking through thick brush and not paying attention to the foliage around me, until my legs became insnared by a thorn bush.  I looked down and noticed I was surrounded by poison ivy.

My legs had multiple welts and were extremely itchy.  A friend recommended washing my legs in rubbing alcohol, because it will dry up the welts and remove all the poison from my skin.

I was skeptical, but willing to give it a try.  To my amazement the rubbing alcohol did a fantastic job.  I can still see a few spots on my legs, but they do not itch at all.

If you ever end up with poison ivy, try rubbing alcohol.  It works wonders.

Aging and Disability: Transitions into Residential Care

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The book Aging and Disability:  Transitions into Residential Care is full of useful information that is presented in an organized and concise manner.

Here are a few of the main points:

There are certain personality traits that make it easier for people to successfully transition to residential care:  feeling in control of their lives, valuing strong bonds with friends/family, and viewing change as a challenge rather than as a threat.

The features of successful aging are:  having a sense of purpose, interacting with others, opportunities for personal growth, self-acceptance, and autonomy.

Once an individual is placed in residential care, they still need their family.  The family should be available to check on the quality of care their loved one is receiving, provide companionship, and assist with financial management needs.

Superglueing my Wound

I got a nasty cut on my thumb.  After 15 minutes, it was still bleeding and had not slowed down at all.

There was a family discussion as to whether or not I needed stitches and should I go to the ER to have a doctor examine the wound.  However, I already had my pajamas on, so I didn’t want to leave the house.

We decided to superglue the wound closed to stop the bleeding, which worked.  After that, my thumb was wrapped in gauze and tape.

The worst part, was when Mom cleaned the wound with rubbing alcohol.  I was hollering and squirming around in my chair.  Gwen asked, “On a scale of 1 to 10, what’s your pain level?”  Mom thought that was funny, because I was in more pain after she started doctoring my thumb than I was before she started.

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First Migraine Episode

Last week, I had a migraine for the first time.

It felt like a vice grip was squeezing the back of my head.  The pain was intense.  I actually screamed and tears were flowing down my face.  I could barley walk, because the slightest movement intensified the pain.  Also, lights and sounds made the pain worse.

As a side note:  I don’t tend to react to pain by screaming.  Last year, I fell and fractured two ribs.  I grumbled a bit when it happened, but there were no tears or screams.  The  migraine pain was exponentially worse than fracturing ribs.

I went to the ER twice that day.  During the first visit, the nurse checked my blood pressure and it was normal.  The doctor prescribed muscle relaxers and pain medication.  I was also given three injections, an anti-inflammatory, Benadryl, and a muscle relaxer.

Twelve hours later, I had another migraine.  The second one was even more painful than the first one.

Mom and Gwen took me to the hospital.  When they checked my blood pressure it was 178/81.  Mom asked the nurse about it, because I don’t have a history of high blood pressure.  The nurse explained that extreme pain can result in elevated blood pressure.

I was given intravenous medications to knock out the migraine and sent home with strict instructions to rest.

I never truly understood the devastation caused by migraines.

To migraine suffers, you have my empathy and respect.  You have to be a strong person to live with migraines.

I also want to say thanks to my family.  They have been a great help.  Mom and Gwen made sure I was able to rest by taking over my household chores.  They also spent hours with me at the ER.  Without them, I am sure my recovery would have taken a lot longer.

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source:  www.axonoptics.com