Museums and Party Crashing

I was driving through Sylacauga, Alabama, and I saw a local museum that looked interesting.  The museum was free and had a mix of art and historical exhibits.

There was a family reunion in the event room at the museum.  I didn’t plan to crash a party that day, but the opportunity just presented itself, so I did it.

I ended up eating some of the best macaroni and cheese I have ever tasted.  I thought about sending a letter to the museum to tell the person that set up the party how much I loved that macaroni and cheese (singed by the party crasher).

Weeden House Museum – Huntsville, Alabama

I throughly enjoyed my visit to the Weeden House Museum.  There are a lot of interesting things to see and the tour guide did a fabulous job.

The Weeden House was built in 1819, by H.C. Bradford.  The intricate woodwork and the federal architectural style is stunning.  The Weeden family owned the home from 1845 to 1956.

Maria Howard Weeden (1846-1905) lived in this house her entire life.  She was a poet and an artist.  Maira was particularly interested in the lives of the black people she encountered on a regular basis.  She was bothered by the way they were treated and wanted to give them a voice in the world.

Maria Howard Weeden painted realistic portraits of the black people, instead of the cartoonish images that were popular during the Reconstruction period.

Maria also spent hours talking to the black people she painted, so she could learn their life stories.

Maria used poetry to expose the horrible circumstances of their lives.  The rhythm and cadence reflected the positive personalities of the people, in spite of their lifelong suffering.

Maria Howard Weeden was truly a woman ahead of her time.

Hank Williams – Boyhood Home Museum

As a child, Hank Williams, Sr. lived in Georgiana, Alabama, (about an hour south of Montgomery).  The house he lived in is now a museum.  The exhibits include some personal items, albums, posters, and other things of historical significance.

It’s small but interesting.  The workers are knowledgeable about the history of the house and will gladly answer any questions.

I enjoyed my visit and would recommend it to anyone traveling through the area.

Frist Art Museum – Nashville, Tennessee

The building was originally a post office and was constructed in the 1930s.  It’s a stunning building with beautiful walkways and grand staircases.  It was built with white Georgia marble and gray-pink Minnesota granite.

After the new post office was built in the 1980s, the building had little purpose and was mostly unused.  Dr. Thomas Frist, Jr. worked with the city of Nashville to convert the building into a visual arts museum, which opened to the public on April 8, 2001.

There are still large areas under construction, so the gallery was smaller than I anticipated based on the size of the building.  However, I did enjoy my time there and fell in love with the architecture.