My Cattle Dog Needs Help

thumbnail-2.jpeg

Blue is an Australian Cattle Dog and he loves to put things in a group.  That boy will herd anything.

Blue is now trying to herd bees.  He stares at them while they are fluttering around the flowers, but if they try to leave the area he pounces and nips at them.

I tried to explain to Blue that bees are an important part of the ecosystem, so he should leave them alone.  Also, getting stung by bees is painful.  However, Blue is ignoring my advice.

I need to find some cows, sheep, chickens, cats, or small children for Blue to herd.  He needs help to channel his herding drive.

Joey Scared Us Yesterday

Yesterday morning, Joey was struggling to walk.  His back was hunched over and he was obviously in pain.  Since Joey is a 10 year old Labrador/Great Pyrenees mix I was greatly concerned.

I took Joey to the veterinarian.  They did x-rays and gave him a full physical, but couldn’t find anything wrong.  The doctor decided to check Joey’s anal glands.  He wasn’t dragging his butt on the ground, so it wasn’t the first thing that came to mind.

She discovered Joey’s anal glands are infected.  All he needs is some antibiotics and he will be fine.  The Thaler family let out a sigh of relief.  We all love that old dog.

 

Three Dimensional Dog

FullSizeRender-3.jpg

I enjoy working with and training my dogs.  I’ve read a ton of books on dog training and attended several different training schools with my dogs.  However, the book “Three Dimensional Dog” by Aaron McDonald is different from anything I have encountered up to this point.

It was eye opening and changed my entire approach to dog training.  While I was reading the book, I was wondering why didn’t I think about these issues.  It seems so obvious now.

The first part of the book explains the differences between trick training and cognitive behavior training.

Most dogs are trained to perform an action for a treat.  The training is focused only on the outer behavior of the dog.  This is known as trick training.

Cognitive behavior training looks at the whole dog.  It addresses the inner mind and emotions of the dog and uses that information to teach the dog how to live peacefully within the family unit.  The three dimensional approach to dog training is based on cognitive behaviorism.

The first dimension that needs to be addressed is the dog’s emotional needs.  Does the dog feel safe and have appropriate boundaries?  Are the dog’s physical needs being addressed?

The second dimension is concerned with what the dog is thinking.  Before a dog does anything they will develop an intellectual plan.  Paying attention to the dog’s body language will tell you how the dog is feeling and give you insight into what the dog is thinking.

The third dimension involves action.  It is everything the dog does with their body.  This is where traditional training methods actually start.

Addressing the dogs physical, emotional, and intellectual needs will allow the dog to reach a state of actualization.  Also, focusing on the three dimensions help the dog achieve a balanced emotional state.  This allows the dog to reach their fullest potential and be a functioning member of the family unit.

National Love Your Pet Day

When we adopt a dog or any pet, we know it is going to end with us having to say goodbye, but we still do it.  And we do it for a very good reason:  They bring so much joy and optimism and happiness.  They attack every moment of every day with that attitude. (Bruce Cameron)

Pets are humanizing.  They remind us we have an obligation and responsibility to persevere and nurture and care for all life.  (James Cromwell)

Anthropomorphized my Dogs

I got to wondering what my dogs would be like as people.  This is what I came up with.

Ben is a Great Pyrenees and the laziest dog I have ever seen.  I think Ben would be a mid-level office worker that spends all his free time watching T.V.

19665563_1643727309013326_7633998450436105438_n

Blue is an Australian Cattle Dog.  He would make a wonderful drill sergeant, because he loves barking out orders and telling everyone where they should be going.

thumbnail-2

Joey is a Labrador/Pyrenees mix.  He is hyperactive, stubborn, and goofy.  I can picture Joey as an excellent high school P.E. teacher.

joey-book-company

Norton is a terrier mix.  He may be the smallest dog in our family, but his brothers never mess with him.  He has a big attitude.  I think Norton would be a successful politician.

19657201_1643727169013340_2808261298052810869_n

Buddy is a Rottweiler/Beagle mix.  He is all about fairness.  In fact, if Buddy sees one of his brothers being mean to another brother he will jump into action and defend the one being wronged.  That’s why I think Buddy would be a social worker.

20840758_1689883254397731_5193031410710066678_n