The Illustrated Man by Ray Bradbury

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Ray Bradbury’s book The Illustrated Man was published in 1951, and it is considered a classic.

The book is about a man whose body is covered in magical tattoos.  The tattoos move and  play out stores of various people living in the future.

Each chapter of the book contains a science-fiction story, in which technology has a massive impact on human behavior.  The characters for each story relatable, even if you end up hating them.

The stories often have surprise endings that may leave you feeling baffled or dejected.  Despite the dismal endings and the pessimistic feelings aroused by the stories, I thoroughly enjoyed reading the book.

Fahrenheit 451

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I just finished reading Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury.  My favorite section in the book, is when Montag asked, “Where do we go from here?  Would books help us?”

Faber responded: “Only if the third necessary thing could be given us.  Number one, as I said, quality of information.  Number two: leisure to digest it.  And number three:  the right to carry out actions based on what we learn from the interaction of the  first two.”

Although it wasn’t mentioned in this section, but it was alluded to in other parts of the book, another thing needed is the desire to read and learn from books.

You don’t have to burn books to make them ineffective.  You just have to get people to stop reading them.  You get them to not want to read books.