Parking Meter History

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Several years ago, I decided to read about the history of parking meters.  I know, it doesn’t exactly sound like a thriller.  However, it was interesting.

What really surprised me was the location of the first parking meter.  I would have guessed an extremely large city like New York or Chicago.  I was wrong.  The first parking meter was installed in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.  Go figure….

 

 

Three Dimensional Dog

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I enjoy working with and training my dogs.  I’ve read a ton of books on dog training and attended several different training schools with my dogs.  However, the book “Three Dimensional Dog” by Aaron McDonald is different from anything I have encountered up to this point.

It was eye opening and changed my entire approach to dog training.  While I was reading the book, I was wondering why didn’t I think about these issues.  It seems so obvious now.

The first part of the book explains the differences between trick training and cognitive behavior training.

Most dogs are trained to perform an action for a treat.  The training is focused only on the outer behavior of the dog.  This is known as trick training.

Cognitive behavior training looks at the whole dog.  It addresses the inner mind and emotions of the dog and uses that information to teach the dog how to live peacefully within the family unit.  The three dimensional approach to dog training is based on cognitive behaviorism.

The first dimension that needs to be addressed is the dog’s emotional needs.  Does the dog feel safe and have appropriate boundaries?  Are the dog’s physical needs being addressed?

The second dimension is concerned with what the dog is thinking.  Before a dog does anything they will develop an intellectual plan.  Paying attention to the dog’s body language will tell you how the dog is feeling and give you insight into what the dog is thinking.

The third dimension involves action.  It is everything the dog does with their body.  This is where traditional training methods actually start.

Addressing the dogs physical, emotional, and intellectual needs will allow the dog to reach a state of actualization.  Also, focusing on the three dimensions help the dog achieve a balanced emotional state.  This allows the dog to reach their fullest potential and be a functioning member of the family unit.

The Wit and Wisdom of Mark Twain

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My favorite quotes from The Wit & Wisdom of Mark Twain:

  • A human being has a natural desire to have more of a good thing than he needs.
  • It is our nature to conform; it is a force which not many can successfully resist.
  • An uneasy conscience is a hair in the mouth.
  • I was seldom able to see an opportunity until it had ceased to be one.
  • Experience is an author’s most valuable asset; experience is the thing that puts the muscle and the breath and the warm blood into the book he writes.
  • Many a small thing has been made large by advertising.
  • Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to reform (or pause and reflect).
  • Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness.

Fahrenheit 451

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I just finished reading Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury.  My favorite section in the book, is when Montag asked, “Where do we go from here?  Would books help us?”

Faber responded: “Only if the third necessary thing could be given us.  Number one, as I said, quality of information.  Number two: leisure to digest it.  And number three:  the right to carry out actions based on what we learn from the interaction of the  first two.”

Although it wasn’t mentioned in this section, but it was alluded to in other parts of the book, another thing needed is the desire to read and learn from books.

You don’t have to burn books to make them ineffective.  You just have to get people to stop reading them.  You get them to not want to read books.

My Personal Legend

This book is about a young man seeking his personal legend (following his dreams).

While I was reading the book, I spent a good deal of time thinking about my own personal legend.

I enjoy reading, traveling, and seeking out unique adventures.  I also enjoy writing about my adventures, my life, and my thoughts on various subjects.

At this point in my life, I am able to do all these things.  I feel like I am living my own personal legend.

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The Art of Letting Go

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This was an enjoyable book to read and full of practical advice.  The main things I learned from reading it:

  • Anything that feels forced or harder than it should be or causes you pain and distress is not meant for you.
  • If we keep holding on to toxic situations or toxic people because we’ve already done too much or it’s too late to change things, we are only setting ourselves up for a miserable life.

The Art of Happiness

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This is an excellent book and full of wonderful advice on how to achieve happiness in our modern world.  A few of my favorite points are listed below.

  • Happiness can be achieved through training the mind.
  • Success may result in a temporary feeling of elation, or tragedy may send us into a period of depression, but sooner or later our overall level of happiness tends to migrate back to a certain baseline.
  • Whether we are feeling happy or unhappy at any given moment often has very little to do with our absolute conditions, but rather it is a function of how we perceive our situation, how satisfied we are with what we have.
  • Our feelings of contentment are strongly influenced by our tendency to compare.
  • Greed is an exaggerated form of desire, based on over expectation.
  • The true antidote of greed is contentment.
  • Inner contentment is not to have what we want, but rather to want and appreciate what we have.
  • It is more sensible to spend energy focusing on the solution than worrying about the problem.