The Born Again Runner

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In his book, Pete Magill, talks about how developing a running habit transformed his life.  The book is interesting, because it is filling with personal/inspirational stories and has a lot of great technical information on running.

Here are a few of my favorite points from the book:

  • The act of running is a learned skill, not an innate one, and endurance is earned through weeks and months of training, not through birthright.
  • Success in a running program demands patience and planning.
  • Run first.  Then buy gear and gadgets as your training requires.  It’s a mental thing.  You’re either starting your running program, or you’re delaying it.
  • By starting a running program, you are exercising your power to become the person you want to be.  Don’t relinquish that power-not for a second-to the infrequent negative comment.
  • The fastest way to become a successful runner is to take your time.  Slower gets you there faster.  Faster seldom gets you there at all.
  • To expect change in the future without instigating that change today is like expecting a flower to blossom from a seed that was never planted.  The time to implement change is the present.  It’s right now.

Not Your Average Runner by Jill Angie

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Jill Angie is “not your average runner.”  In her book she shares her personal failures and triumphs as a runner.  She also gives advice on how to get started, training for beginners, and running gear.

This book is entertaining, easy to read, and inspirational.  I recommend it to anyone that wants to start a new exercise program, but feels embarrassed by their current weight.

 

Staggering to the Finish Line

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Saturday night, I participated in the “Light Up The Night 5k” charity race. Even though it was only 3 weeks after my surgery, I thought I would be fine.  I felt good that day and did well during the first mile.

However, I started getting dizzy near the 1 mile mark.  I slowed down my pace, but the dizziness just kept getting worse.

I refused to quit, so I just kept on walking.  At times, I staggered and stumbled on the road.  Moving my head or even my eyes made it worse.  Lights were also difficult and I felt like my head was spinning.

An hour had passed and I still wasn’t at the finished line.  My family was concerned, so Gwen took off in an attempt to find me.  She located me as I was turning to make the final stretch to the finish line.

I told Gwen what was going on and she offered to help.  She grabbed my hand and walked with me for the rest of the race.  I kept my head down and tried to avoid doing anything that would make me feel worse.  At times I would close my eyes and relied on Gwen to keep me from getting hurt.

We crossed the finish line and a doctor approached us.  He started to check my pulse and asked about my breathing.  I told him about my surgery and said I was just dizzy.  The doctor made sure I had a chair and hung around for a while to ensure nothing serious was going on with me.

I felt miserable that night, but I am glad I completed the race with Gwen’s help.

 

Double Helix Dash 5K

Today, I completed the Double Helix Dash 5k charity race.  This was my third race and it was the first time I didn’t come in last place.  I am supper happy about that.

I really appreciate my mom coming out to support me.  It’s nice to have someone wish you good luck at the starting line and have them congratulate you when you cross the finish line.  It means a lot to know she loves me and cares enough to be at the races.

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