Friends With Similar Disabilities

I stumbled across this news article the other day.

http://www.wbtv.com/story/38883711/hearing-aids-lead-to-unique-friendship-at-madison-county-elementary-school

To sum it up, a forth grader with a hearing disability saw a kindergartner wearing hearing aids, so he went up the kindergartner and introduced himself.  The kindergartner was thrilled to meet another child with hearing aids.

The two boys have become friends, due to their shared experience.  They are able to work together to teach other kids about their disability and how hearing aids work.

They can also help each other navigate through obstacles and pitfalls that occur when you have a hearing disability in childhood.

This article touched my heart, because I too have a hearing disability that started in early childhood.  I wasn’t lucky enough to meet another hearing disabled child, so I often struggled alone.

Even as an adult, if I run into a young person with a hearing aid I feel an immediate connection.  I want to talk to them about their experiences, how they handle certain situations, and how having a hearing disability has impacted their life.

Growing up with a hearing impairment is a unique experience and not something most people can understand.  I am glad these boys found each other.

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Fragile X Fragile Hope (Parenting a Special Needs Child)

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I learned a lot from reading “Fragile X Fragile Hope” by Elizabeth Griffin and also found it to be inspirational.  Her son, Zach, is intellectually disabled and displays autistic features, which was caused by Fragile X syndrome.

Elizabeth Griffin talks about the medical ramifications that cause her son to struggle in daily life.  For example, Zach’s stress hormones are heightened whenever he experiences a stressor.  Also, those chemicals will remain active in the brain much longer than normal.  As a result, he struggles to remain calm during normal daily events.

Elizabeth Griffin also discusses her feelings of desperation, guilt, and grief.  She gives an honest portrayal of those emotions and how they affected her life.  Support groups became essential, so she could work through those feelings and thoughts without fear of judgement.

There is section about navigating the maze of available services.  She discovered some treatments were a waste of time and money, but others were extremely beneficial.  Therefore, it is important to fully investigate your options and the services offered.

I recommend this book to anyone with a special needs child.  It is also beneficial to people who want to gain a better understand of the struggles faced by parents with disabled children.