Unconditional Forgiveness

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I enjoyed reading this book.  Here are a few of the things I learned.

  • Forgiveness is not a feeling.  Forgiveness is a choice to end the cycle of revenge and leave justice in the hands of God.
  • Forgiveness seems to have the capacity to alter suffering from something that is purely destructive to something that has profound redemptive qualities.
  • Unforgiveness has a devastating way of eliminating new possibilities.  Everything remains chained to the past, and the suffered injustice becomes the single informing event in the life of the embittered soul.
  • The way of forgives does not forget the past, but through truth and reconciliation it finds a way beyond toxic memory.  It is the way of restorative justice.

Death of a Sibling

The death of my brother (Aaron Thaler) was devastating.

I was a few weeks shy of 3 years old when Aaron was born, so he was a part of my life for as long as I can remember.

My father was in the Army and we grew up overseas.  I didn’t really get to know my extended family until I was a teenager and I never had the same friend for more than a couple of years.

That made my relationship with Aaron even more special.  He was that one person I was able to play with and fight with, all throughout my childhood years.  He was my only consistent friend.

We had our ups and downs together.  Many battles were fought and a lot of blood was spilt.  However, no grudges were held.  After a few days, we would laugh about the last fight as if it was all a game.

Aaron died suddenly and I spent the first month in a state of shock.  Eventually the reality hit me and I went into a deep state of depression.

It’s been five years since Aaron passed, but I will always miss my brother.

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Major Depression Feels Like….

Major depression feels like:

  • You are drowning and you reach up for help, but no-one is there.
  • You have to act calm on the outside, but inside you are screaming in agony.
  • You are trapped in a cage and you are pacing back and forth like an animal.
  • You have a pressure cooker inside your body and it is about to explode.
  • You are alone in the world, because you are unable to connect to people.  You cannot relate to them and they cannot relate to you.
  • There’s a dark cloud looming over you.
  • There’s a monster inside of you and it is crushing your soul.

Project Semicolon – Raising Awareness

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Project Semicolon was started to raise awareness of how mental illnesses can create havoc in a person’s life and lead to suicide or suicidal ideations.  It was designed to function as an anti-suicide initiative.

The semicolon is used in a sentence when the sentence could have ended, but the author decided to continue the sentence.  You are the author and the sentence is your life, so don’t end your sentence prematurely.

 

 

Adjustment Disorder by J.B. Snow

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This book was rather interesting and educational.  It was easy to read and easy to understand.

The main points are:

  • Adjustment disorder is the inability to cope with a life stressor.
  • Risk for developing adjustment disorder increases for those with sensory sensitivity, genetic predisposition, or have experienced any type of trauma.
  • The following can help when dealing with adjustment disorder:  building a support system, deep breathing exercises, medication, therapy, life skills training, healthy diet, plenty of sleep, exercising, and journaling.

Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus

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The book, Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus, was written by Dr. John Gray.  It was published in the 1990’s, and is still popular today.

To be honest, I didn’t like the book.  I found it to be stereotypical and redundant.  The aspect that bothered me the most was the repetitiveness of each concept.  I felt like I was reading the same information in each chapter, with only a slight variation in wording.

Have you read this book?  What did you think about it?