Poor Baby Ben

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Baby Ben’s knee is dislocated and he will need surgery to repair it.  Apparently, the knee would pop out of place and then pop back into place.  This explains why the regular veterinarian didn’t see it on the x-rays.

I took Ben to an orthopedic veterinarian, Dr. Newman, and he was able to diagnose the problem and said the only way to fix it was to surgically stabilize the knee.

Surgery is scheduled for Tuesday and then he will need six weeks of rehabilitation to ensure complete healing of the joint.

We are all praying for a quick and full recovery.

Ben – We Can’t Wait to See You Again

A few months ago, Ben was playing and hurt his knee.  I took him to the doctor several times.  They examined his leg and took numerous x-rays.

It looks like Ben damaged a ligament.  Luckily, it doesn’t appear to be completely torn.  The doctor also found evidence of a bone spur.

Ben was prescribed two rounds of anti-inflammatory medication and pain medications.  We tried various other treatments, but nothing worked.  Ben is still limping and in obvious pain.

The doctor recommended putting Ben on strict bed rest for 6 to 8 weeks.  If that doesn’t work, our only option will be surgery to fix his knee.

Enforcing strict bed rest at home is an imposable task, especially with four other dogs in the house.  We decided the best thing for Ben was to let him stay at the veterinarian’s office.

I packed a duffle bag for Ben, so he could have his own bed, blanket, and his favorite dog food.  It was sad to leave him, knowing he might not be coming home for two months.  I felt like crying, but managed to hold back the tears.

This is going to be hard for Ben, his doggy brothers, and his family.  However, it is the best thing for Ben.  I look forward to the day when Ben comes home.  I hope to watch him run and play with his brothers, without limping in pain.

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We love you Baby Ben and we can’t wait to see you again.

Dog Care the A-Z List

A – Agility is a great sport for high energy dogs.  It also creates a deeper bond between dog and owner.

B – Boarding options should be researched in advance to ensure your dog will be comfortable and will be well cared for when you have to be away from him.

C – Collars shouldn’t be tight or constricting.  Make sure you can easily slide two fingers under the collar.

D – Dog parks are a great way to allow your dog time to socialize with other dogs and expend some of their energy.  They are also a wonderful place for the owner to make new friends.

E – Emergency veterinarian clinics are available in many locations.  Research your area and find the one closest to you, so you know where to go in case of a medical emergency.

F – Food for dogs come in a wide variety of quality.  Reading the label will help you find food that has quality ingredients.  Try to stay away from brands that are made of corn and meat byproducts to keep your dog healthy and happy.

G – Grooming your dog can be great bonding opportunity.  Most dogs love to have their coats brushed.  However, bath time can be a bit tricky with a dog.  It is important to be patient, positive, provide warm water, and do your best to make your dog comfortable.

H – Heartworms are deadly parasites that live in the heart and they are transmitted by misquote bites.  Heartworm prevention can save your dog’s life.  Talk to your veterinarian if your dog is not already on a heartworm prevention medication.

I – Identification is important, in case your dog ever gets lost.  Putting tags on your dog’s collar and having them microchipped will increase the chances of your dog returning home.

J – Jumping is a common problem with dogs.  To teach a dog not to jump, ignore them whenever they try it.  I will turn away from the dog and not even look at them, until they become calm.

K – Kids love to pet dogs, but it is important to monitor them for the dog’s safety and the children’s safety.

L – Leashes come in a variety of styles.  Retractable leashes can be dangerous, because they break easily.  They can also get stuck, which makes it difficult to get your dog under control in a potentially dangerous situation.

M – Mothers and puppies should stay together for at least six to eight weeks.  The puppies need time to mature and be weened.  They also benefit by learning appropriate dog manners from their mother and their siblings.

N – Natural disasters happen all over the world.  It is important to have a plan for your dog in case of emergency situations.

O – Oral hygiene is often overlooked in dogs, but having an unhealthy mouth can cause other medical problems.  Dry food is better for the dog’s teeth.  It is also important to have their teeth regularly cleaned.

P – Paws are another area that tends to get overlooked.  Dogs need their nails trimmed to prevent foot pain and injury.  They also need the pads on their feet inspected for any cuts or abrasions that may need to be treated.

Q – Quite spaces to rest are important to dogs.  They like having a little personal space from time to time.  Teach children not to disturb the dog, when they are in their quite/personal resting space.

R – Rescue organizations are full of dogs of every size and breed.  Dogs get sent to these places for a number of reasons and it is often not the dog’s fault.  You can find a great dog by checking your local rescue organization.

S – Socialization is important for all dogs.  They need to know how to behave around other dogs and people.  When socializing your pet, try to introduce them to all kinds of people.

T – Training your dog can be fun and creates a deeper bond between you and your pet.  Training can be done at home or you can take your dog to a training school.  I enjoy the training schools, because we get to meet different people and practice training skills in a wide variety of settings.

U – Understanding your dog will improve your relationship with your dog.  Dogs use body language to communicate with us and other dogs.  You can easily learn what your dog is saying by reading books on dog body language or doing a little bit of online research.

V – Vaccinations help your dog stay healthy and live a longer life.  A lot of countries require dogs to be vaccinated for rabies, but there are other diseases that can be prevented through vaccinations (parvovirus, distemper, bordetella, and canine hepatitis).

W – Walking your dog can be a lot of fun for both you and the dog.  Dogs love to explore and sniff new areas.  They also love doing fun things with their owner.

X – Xerox copies of important documents (vaccination records, microchip information, and other medical documents) can be a life saver in emergency situations.

Y – Yacking or spitting up stuff is a common problem.  Dogs will vomit much easier and more often than humans.  When a mother dog is trying to ween her puppies, she will eat food and then regurgitate it back out for the puppies.  This allows the puppies to go from milk to soft foods and eventually to eating regular food.  That’s why dogs are more prone to vomiting.  However, it can also be a sign that your dog needs medical attention.

Z – Zest and a zeal for life is common among dogs.  They tend to appreciate the mundane things of life and bring joy to those around them.

Poor Joey is Sick

I noticed one of Joey’s toes is swollen, so I took him to the veterinarian.

I confess, as soon as I saw his swollen toe I was very worried about Joey.  He is 9 or 10 years old and a 100 pound Labrador/Great Pyrenees mix.  That puts him in the geriatric range and increases his risk for health problems.

I am glad to report that Joey will be fine.  The veterinarian found a small cut on the toe, which became infected.  He doesn’t have a fever and there is no sign that the infection spread past his toe.  The doctor prescribed and antibiotic and an anti-inflammatory.

Joey needs a few days of TLC and he will be back to his rambunctious self in no time.

Happiest Dog Ever

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Joey is the happiest dog I have ever seen.  His personality type can best be described as a party looking for a place to happen.

A few days ago, Joey went to the veterinarian’s office for his yearly shots.  He rushed in the door and greeted everyone with great enthusiasm.  The doctor was checking Joey’s vitals and giving him his shots, while Joey was resting his head on her shoulder trying to give her a hug.  He got extra treats for that, of course.

Joey is one happy dog.

Joey – Self Inflected Injuries

Joey had a habit of injuring himself, while he was goofing around or playing.

One evening, Joey was running around the yard.  However, he was looking to his left and not in the direction he was running.  He ended up running into a tree with a low hanging branch.  He had cuts on his eyebrow and eyelid.  He also had scratches on his cornea.

Joey came running back to me with blood pouring form his face.  I immediately took Joey to the emergency veterinarian clinic, since this did not happen during regular business hours.

The doctors cleaned his face and removed bark from his eye.  I was given prescription eye drops to put in Joey’s eye three times a day to prevent infection.

Joey was not happy about those eye drops.  I had to put Joey in a head lock, pry open his eye, and then squirt the drops on his face.  He was bucking like some kind of wild horse, so I just kept squirting and hopped some of the medication actually made it into his eye.

His eye healed nicely and he didn’t lose his vision, so I guess it worked.

The second self-inflicted injury happened while we were at a training class.  We were in a large room with metal support poles running along the center of the room.

We arrived early, so Joey decided to spend his time playing.  He was jumping and spinning around in circles.  Unfortunately, he wasn’t paying attention to his surroundings and banged his head into one of the poles.

It made a loud bonging noise and Joey was staggering as he walked away.  My goofy dog ended up with a concussion and we were back at the veterinarian’s office.

I tried to convince the doctor to put Joey on a sedative to help him calm down, for his own protection.  The veterinarian refused my request.  She said Joey is a high spirited dog, but he is tough enough to withstand his own silliness.

I was a bit disappointed, I was really hoping for some sedatives to slow this wild dog down a bit.  His destructive habits and self-injuries behavior had blown a massive hole in my budget.

 

Blue is Terrified of Nail Trims

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I rescued Blue almost two years ago.  He has been a great addition to our family.  He is obedient, an excellent traveling companion, and very protective of his pack.  Basically, Blue is a happy fellow.

Unfortunately, his previous life was not so happy and certain situations will make it very obvious that he still harbors some terrible memories.

Yesterday, I took Blue to the veterinarian for his yearly shots.  He did great when they took a blood sample and gave him the injections. However, when Dr. Buxton approached Blue with the nail trimmer, he went absolutely ballistic.

Before the doctor even touched Blue, he was already snapping, snarling, growling, and lunging at her.  The tech placed a muzzle on Blue and had to hold him down while the doctor trimmed his nails.  I could see the panic in Blue’s eyes and I felt horrible for him.

After it was all over, they put the clippers away and gave Blue a few treats.  He started to calm down and we went to the front to pay the bill.

I don’t know who hurt Blue and caused him to be so scared of getting his nails done, but I hope karma catches up with that idiot.