Bariatric Mindset Success

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Kristin Lloyd is a social worker that struggled with her weight, so she had bariatric surgery.  She now offers counseling to others who are going through the surgery process.

She is relatable and her vast experience makes her a great candidate to teach others about bariatric surgery.  In her book, she shares her personal experiences, advice on how to succeed, and warnings about common pitfalls.

My favorite quote from the book is, “Having weight loss surgery is the first step in breaking out of the victim cycle, because this means you are acting and doing something to take back control over yourself and your life.”

The Sleeved Life by Pennie Nicola

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Pennie Nicola had gastric sleeve surgery and wrote this book to help others who are considering the surgery or who have recently had the surgery.  Her book is full of useful advice on how to decide if the surgery is right for you, picking a surgeon, and on how to succeed after the surgery.

She sums up her book with seven rules for the sleeved life.

  1.  East less than full capacity
  2. Never eat and drink at the same time
  3. Exercise 4-6 times a week
  4. Keep carbs low
  5. Eat protein first
  6. Drink a lot of water
  7. Allow 20-30 minutes for a meal

Basic Healthy Nutritional Guidelines

  1.  Eat three meals a day at regular times to maintain blood sugar and prevent overeating.
  2. Snacks should be used when meals will be more than 4 hours apart.
  3. Balance your plate with 1/4 carbohydrates, 1/4 protein, and 1/2 vegetables/fruit.
  4. Take small bites and chew your food thoroughly (at least 20 times).
  5. Measure your food according to serving size recommendations.
  6. Avoid high-sugar foods and decrease desserts to no more than once a week.
  7. Practice mindful eating by eating at a table and turning off distractions.
  8. Consume 60 to 80 grams of protein daily.
  9. Consume at least 64 ounces of water daily.

 

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Source:  Crestwood Medical Center in Huntsville, Alabama 

Taking Drastic Measures

I’ve battled with my weight most of my life.  Over the years, I managed to lose up to a 100 pounds only to regain the weight.

That’s when I decided to take drastic measures.  I called a surgeon and asked about bariatric surgery.

Before the surgery date, I had to participate in a weight loss program, talk with a nutritionist, get a psychiatric evaluation, and there were few other things that needed to be accomplished.

I managed to meet all those goals and my insurance company gave their approval.  I had the surgery last Thursday (16 August).

I am looking forward to starting my new life, now that I have the tools to succeed.

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Adorable Fat Girl by Bernice Bloom

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Bernice Bloom discusses her weight loss journey, both the success and the failures, in her book Adorable Fat Girl.  The book contains five important tips for successful weight loss.

  • Understand what your body wants
    • Eat when you are hungry, not just because you are bored, lonely, or emotional
    • Eat the foods your body needs to stay healthy
  • Psych yourself in, instead of psyching yourself out
  • Be nice to yourself, treat yourself with respect
    • Consuming large quantities of junk food is hazardous to your health
    • Eating healthy foods is a sign of respect for yourself and your body
  • WAW!  Water and Walking
    • Consuming water is great for your health and can decrease hunger pains
    • Walking is an easy exercise to incorporate into your life
  • Make it a habit

The one thing I really appreciated about this book was the honesty.  The writer admitted how difficult her weight loss journey.  She also explained how to overcome the common stumbling blocks to weight loss, using her own personal experience.

This is a very interesting book and worth reading.

 

5th Race Completed

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I completed my fifth charity race today.  The race was called “Out Run Hunger.”  It raised money for House of Harvest, which is a food pantry in Harvest, Alabama.

At the end of a race, I always feel like I am about to puke.  However, there is something about crossing that finish line and hearing people congratulate me for completing the race.  It motivates me to workout more, so I can improve my time.  It also makes me excited for the next race.

This is how my race schedule has gone so far:

  • 1st race was 1 mile and I came in last
  • 2nd race was 5k and I came in last
  • 3rd race was 5k and I came in second to last
  • 4th race was 4k and there were 6 people that finished after me
  • 5th race was 5k and I came in last